Can you have stomach cancer and not know?

How would I feel if I had stomach cancer?

Feeling full: Many stomach cancer patients experience a sense of “fullness” in the upper abdomen after eating small meals. Heartburn: Indigestion, heartburn or symptoms similar to an ulcer may be signs of a stomach tumor. Nausea and vomiting: Some stomach cancer patients have symptoms that include nausea and vomiting.

How do I check myself for stomach cancer?

Signs and Symptoms of Stomach Cancer

  1. Poor appetite.
  2. Weight loss (without trying)
  3. Abdominal (belly) pain.
  4. Vague discomfort in the abdomen, usually above the navel.
  5. Feeling full after eating only a small meal.
  6. Heartburn or indigestion.
  7. Nausea.
  8. Vomiting, with or without blood.

How long can you have stomach cancer without knowing?

As the cancer progresses, the symptoms that do appear can be misdiagnosed as normal gastrointestinal issues. As a result, stomach cancer can go undetected for years before the symptoms become concerning enough to warrant diagnostic testing.

What color is your poop if you have stomach cancer?

Your poo may be darker – almost black – if your stomach is bleeding. Your poo can also be darker if you’re taking iron tablets.

Can gastritis be mistaken for stomach cancer?

What can mimic the symptoms of stomach cancer? Even if you are experiencing symptoms, this does not always mean you have cancer. Many of the common signs of stomach cancer are often other gastrointestinal conditions, such as GERD, gastritis or peptic ulcers.

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Can a blood test tell if you have stomach cancer?

You might have blood tests to help diagnose stomach cancer. Blood tests can: check your general health, including how well your liver and kidneys are working. check numbers of blood cells.

Is stomach cancer pain constant or intermittent?

Signs and symptoms of gastric cancer

Constant abdominal pain, and particularly back pain, are sinister symptoms implying local invasion by tumour. Chronic or acute bleeding from the tumour may occur, with consequent symptoms. There is often little to be found on examination, but there may be a palpable epigastric mass.