Question: Can I fly during chemotherapy?

Is it safe to fly while on chemotherapy?

With high dose chemotherapy, such as with some leukemias, air travel may be discouraged throughout the duration of treatment.

Can we travel during chemotherapy?

Cancer treatments, like radiotherapy and chemotherapy, can sometimes cause short-term physical problems. Some treatments can also make your skin more sensitive to the sun. These effects can limit the amount of travelling you can do – or the type of activities you do while you’re away.

Does flying affect cancer patients?

The changes in air pressure that happen during a flight can affect certain cancer patients, like those with anemia and those requiring oxygen. Your doctor might also have recommendations for preventing blood clots, since air passengers with cancer are especially susceptible to them.

What do chemo patients need to avoid?

Foods to avoid (especially for patients during and after chemo): Hot, spicy foods (i.e. hot pepper, curry, Cajun spice mix). High fiber foods (i.e. raw fruit and vegetables, coarse whole grains). Fatty, greasy, or fried foods.

Does altitude affect chemotherapy?

The increased side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in cancer patients at high altitude are closely related to hypoxia.

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How long do chemotherapy sessions last?

How long will each session of my chemotherapy treatment take? Chemotherapy treatment varies in length and frequency and depends on the individual treatment plan prescribed by your doctor. Some last as long as three or four hours, while others may only take a half-hour.

How long can you go between chemo treatments?

Most chemotherapy treatments are given in repeating cycles. The length of a cycle depends on the drug(s) you receive. Most cycles range from 2 to 6 weeks.

Can a Stage 4 cancer patient fly?

Many patients with active cancer can fly safely. If you have concerns about your fitness for flying, ask your doctor — some cancer patients (such as those who have had lung-related problems, edema, or recent surgery) might be at risk for complications if they fly.

Can you travel abroad after chemotherapy?

Most people have a lower risk a few weeks after finishing their treatment. People who have had intensive treatment, such as a stem cell transplant, are at risk of infection for longer. After the first year, you can usually travel abroad.

What medical conditions should you not fly with?

We recommend that you always check with your GP and airline prior to air travel.

  • COPD (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease) …
  • Strokes. …
  • Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) …
  • An infectious disease. …
  • Recent surgeries. …
  • Alternatives to flying. …
  • Cruises.
  • Train.